Discussion:
In '70s, movies were more daring, real
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Dr. Jai Maharaj
2014-12-06 02:56:09 UTC
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In '70s, movies were more daring, real

By Michael Wilmington, Tribune movie critic
Chicago Tribune
chicagotribune.com
June 8, 2003

Why were American movies so much better in the 1970s than
in the decades since -- and most of the decades before?

Simple. Our movies then were not as inhibited by
censorship (self-imposed) as they were prior to the '60s.

And they were not as obsessed with huge box office
grosses and commercial values as they became afterward --
following the stunning financial success of those two
'70s superhits, "Jaws" (1975) and "Star Wars" (1977).
Instead, during most of the '60s and '70s -- liberated
both by the collapse of the old studio system strictures
and by the greater acceptance of film as art from critics
and audiences -- American filmmakers of all generations,
from Martin Scorsese ("Mean Streets") and Hal Ashby
("Harold and Maude") to Sidney Lumet ("Dog Day
Afternoon") and Mike Nichols ("Carnal Knowledge") to
Alfred Hitchcock ("Frenzy") and Billy Wilder ("Avanti"),
tried things they wouldn't have dared in the decades
past. More often than not, they succeeded.

The scripts were better, the ideas more daring, the
execution freer, and most of all, the connections to the
real world of American life outside much stronger and
deeper.

Continues at:

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2003-06-08/news/0306080051_1_american-film-godfather-star-wars

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.fan.jai-maharaj
David Johnston
2014-12-07 01:14:48 UTC
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Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
In '70s, movies were more daring, real
By Michael Wilmington, Tribune movie critic
Chicago Tribune
chicagotribune.com
June 8, 2003
Why were American movies so much better in the 1970s than
in the decades since -- and most of the decades before?
Simple. Our movies then were not as inhibited by
censorship (self-imposed) as they were prior to the '60s.
And they were not as obsessed with huge box office
grosses and commercial values as they became afterward --
following the stunning financial success of those two
'70s superhits, "Jaws" (1975) and "Star Wars" (1977).
Instead, during most of the '60s and '70s -- liberated
both by the collapse of the old studio system strictures
and by the greater acceptance of film as art from critics
and audiences -- American filmmakers of all generations,
from Martin Scorsese ("Mean Streets") and Hal Ashby
("Harold and Maude") to Sidney Lumet ("Dog Day
Afternoon") and Mike Nichols ("Carnal Knowledge") to
Alfred Hitchcock ("Frenzy") and Billy Wilder ("Avanti"),
tried things they wouldn't have dared in the decades
past. More often than not, they succeeded.
You know "Frenzy" is the only one of those movies I like.
HardyBoys.us
2014-12-07 01:57:06 UTC
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Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
In '70s, movies were more daring, real
By Michael Wilmington, Tribune movie critic
Chicago Tribune
chicagotribune.com
June 8, 2003
Why were American movies so much better in the 1970s than
in the decades since -- and most of the decades before?
Simple, they weren't. To be sure, there were some classic films from the
70s. But that doesn't make up for the scores of truly awful films from
that decade.
--
The Hardy Boys Unofficial Home Page - http://HardyBoys.us
Dr. Jai Maharaj
2014-12-07 02:57:22 UTC
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In article
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
In '70s, movies were more daring, real
By Michael Wilmington, Tribune movie critic
Chicago Tribune
chicagotribune.com
June 8, 2003
Why were American movies so much better in the 1970s than
in the decades since -- and most of the decades before?
Simple. Our movies then were not as inhibited by
censorship (self-imposed) as they were prior to the '60s.
And they were not as obsessed with huge box office
grosses and commercial values as they became afterward --
following the stunning financial success of those two
'70s superhits, "Jaws" (1975) and "Star Wars" (1977).
Instead, during most of the '60s and '70s -- liberated
both by the collapse of the old studio system strictures
and by the greater acceptance of film as art from critics
and audiences -- American filmmakers of all generations,
from Martin Scorsese ("Mean Streets") and Hal Ashby
("Harold and Maude") to Sidney Lumet ("Dog Day
Afternoon") and Mike Nichols ("Carnal Knowledge") to
Alfred Hitchcock ("Frenzy") and Billy Wilder ("Avanti"),
tried things they wouldn't have dared in the decades
past. More often than not, they succeeded.
The scripts were better, the ideas more daring, the
execution freer, and most of all, the connections to the
real world of American life outside much stronger and
deeper.
http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2003-06-08/news/0306080051_1_american-film-godfather-star-wars

Forwarded post:

1970s movies seem to do well in top movies lists, just as
1970s albums do well in top music lists. I think it was a
creative time for the U.S. and the U.K. Once upon a time
here I added up critics' recommendations for four decades
of movies, and found lower recommendations for movies
from the 1980s and 2000s, while movies from the 1970s and
1990s were neck and neck.

Boomer cultural chauvinism is a palpable and often
irritating phenomenon, but I'm not bold enough to say it
is wholly without foundation. Time will tell if
1960s/1970s culture will be remembered quite as fondly by
people who didn't grow up with it (or by people who
didn't grow up under the strident cultural thumb of
people who grew up with it).

Posted by dgaicun

End of forwarded post.

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

http://tinyurl.com/JaiMaharaj

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